Burns Night 25th January

Welcome one and all to 2017…

No sooner have we all recovered from the festive period then it’s time to prepare for Burns night, which takes place on the 25th of January. Once again we are proud to offer a selection of the finest quality Scottish ingredients in order to make a wonderful Burns Supper, for your guests to remember!

Why not try our new pinhead oatmeal this is excellent for skirlie, which is a Scottish dish, made from pin head oatmeal fried with fat, onions and seasonings. The “skirl” indicates the noise made by the frying ingredients this is excellent served in a chicken breast as an alternative to haggis, neeps and tatties.

If you choose to have haggis on your menu make sure it’s the best from George Cockburn and sons supplied by Mark Murphy and Partner Ltd.

Then to finish, look no further than a Scottish Cranachan flavoured with heather honey and Edradour single malt whiskey or our famous Scottish cheese selection served with poachers pickle and oatcakes.

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Skirlie Recipe

Ingredients

  • .150g bacon fat (may substitute vegetable oil) or 115g beef suet
  • 2onions, finely chopped
  • 170g chicken stock
  • 250g old-fashioned pinhead oatmeal, lightly toasted (do not use instant or quick-cooking oats)
  • Salt and pepper

Method

  1. Melt the fat or heat the oil in a large frying pan.
  2. Add the onion and cook until soft and golden.
  3. Add the oatmeal and mix in well.
  4. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  5. Add the stock and allow it to be absorbed by the oatmeal.
  6. Season well and serve with light creamy mashed potatoes.
  7. (Skirlie may also be used as a stuffing for any kind of game bird or poultry. It is also a very good accompaniment to rich meaty and gamy stews).

 

Scottish Cranachan Flavoured with heather honey and Edradour single malt whisky

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp medium oatmeal.
  • 300g fresh raspberries (Raspberry member of the rose family, raspberries have a wonderfully intense, sweet taste, and many)
  • a little caster sugar to taste
  • 350ml double cream
  • 2 tbsp heather honey flavoured with Edradour single malt whisky
  • 2-3 tbsp whisky of your choice

 

Method

  1. To toast the oatmeal, spread it out on a baking sheet and grill until it smells rich and nutty. It will not darken quickly, so use your sense of smell to tell you when it is nutty enough. Cool the oatmeal.
  2. Make a raspberry purée by crushing half the fruit and sieving. Sweeten this to taste with a little caster sugar. Whisk the double cream until just set, and stir in the honey and whisky, trying not to over-whip the cream. Taste the mix and add more of either if you feel the need.
  3. Stir in the oatmeal and whisk lightly until the mixture is just firm. Alternate layers of the cream with the remaining whole raspberries and purée in 4 serving dishes. Allow to chill slightly before eating.

This poem was written by Burns to celebrate his appreciation of the Haggis. As a result Burns and Haggis have been forever linked.

This particular poem is always the first item on the programme of Burns’ suppers. The haggis is generally carried in on a silver salver (cheiftan) at the start of the proceedings.

As it is brought to the table a piper plays a suitable, rousing accompaniment.

One of the invited artistes then recites the poem before the theatrical cutting of the haggis with the ceremonial knife.

 

Address to a Haggis

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o the puddin’-race!
Aboon them a’ ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye worthy o’ a grace
As lang’s my arm.

The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
In time o need,
While thro your pores the dews distil
Like amber bead.

His knife see rustic Labour dight,
An cut you up wi ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like onie ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm-reekin, rich!

Then, horn for horn, they stretch an strive:
Deil tak the hindmost, on they drive,
Till a’ their weel-swall’d kytes belyve
Are bent like drums;
The auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
‘Bethankit’ hums.

Is there that owre his French ragout,
Or olio that wad staw a sow,
Or fricassee wad mak her spew
Wi perfect scunner,
Looks down wi sneering, scornfu view
On sic a dinner?

Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
As feckless as a wither’d rash,
His spindle shank a guid whip-lash,
His nieve a nit;
Thro bloody flood or field to dash,
O how unfit!

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
He’ll make it whissle;
An legs an arms, an heads will sned,
Like taps o thrissle.

Ye Pow’rs, wha mak mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill o fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
That jaups in luggies:
But, if ye wish her gratefu prayer,
Gie her a Haggis

Address to a Haggis Translation

Fair and full is your honest, jolly face,
Great chieftain of the sausage race!
Above them all you take your place,
Stomach, tripe, or intestines:
Well are you worthy of a grace
As long as my arm.

The groaning trencher there you fill,
Your buttocks like a distant hill,
Your pin would help to mend a mill
In time of need,
While through your pores the dews distill
Like amber bead.

His knife see rustic Labour wipe,
And cut you up with ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like any ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm steaming, rich!

Then spoon for spoon, the stretch and strive:
Devil take the hindmost, on they drive,
Till all their well swollen bellies by-and-by
Are bent like drums;
Then old head of the table, most like to burst,
‘The grace!’ hums.

Is there that over his French ragout,
Or olio that would sicken a sow,
Or fricassee would make her vomit
With perfect disgust,
Looks down with sneering, scornful view
On such a dinner?

Poor devil! see him over his trash,
As feeble as a withered rush,
His thin legs a good whip-lash,
His fist a nut;
Through bloody flood or field to dash,
O how unfit.

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his ample fist a blade,
He’ll make it whistle;
And legs, and arms, and heads will cut off
Like the heads of thistles.

You powers, who make mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill of fare,
Old Scotland wants no watery stuff,
That splashes in small wooden dishes;
But if you wish her grateful prayer,
Give her [Scotland] a Haggis!

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